mood


mood
mood, humor, temper, vein mean a temporary state or frame of mind in which one emotion or desire or one set of emotions gains the ascendancy.
Mood is the comprehensive term for any such frame of mind, regardless of its particular cause, its particular character, its effect on others, or its length of existence
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he indulged his moods. If he were surly, he did not bother to hide it— Mailer

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Mood carries a stronger implication of pervasiveness and of compelling power than the other terms; also, it may refer not only to the frame of mind
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feel in a mood to work

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a sullen mood

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but to its expression in a literary or artistic work
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the language, the stresses, the very structure of the sentences are imposed upon the writer by the special mood of the piece— Cather

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or to what is seen or heard in such a way as to evoke a mood or to harmonize with one's mood
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the mood of the landscape, achieved by the beauty of the evening light— Kenneth Clark

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watching land and water, rocks and trees, and their ever-changing hues and moodsSemon

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Humor (see also WIT 2) applies chiefly to a mood which is the result of one's peculiar temperament or of one's physical or mental condition at the moment; it may be preferable to mood when the idea of capriciousness or of whimsicality is to be suggested
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I am not in a humor to hear you further. Leave me, please— Hardy

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the women were horrified or admiring, as their humor moved them— Wharton

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victims of nature's cataclysmic humorsJulian Dana

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Temper (see also DISPOSITION 2) applies to a mood dominated by a single strong emotion, often specifically that of great anger
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"He is in a temper!" "I never knew him so out of patience with them"— Millay

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When qualified by an adjective indicating the controlling emotion, temper may apply to any humor that manifests itself in a display of feeling
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that meekness has done me more harm than the bitterest temperHardy

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she was evidently now in a gay, frolicsome temperHudson

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Vein (see also TOUCH) is often used in the sense of mood but with a stronger implication of transitoriness and seldom with any suggestion of a temperamental or physical basis
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the merry vein you knew me in, is sunk into a turn of reflection— Pope

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the whole is written in a vein of ironic seriousness— Laski

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Analogous words: *disposition, temper, temperament, character, personality, individuality: *soul, spirit: emotion, *feeling, affection

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

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  • Mood — Mood …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • mood — W3S3 [mu:d] n ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(way you feel)¦ 2 be in a mood 3 be/feel in the mood for something 4 be in no mood for something/to do something 5¦(way a place or event feels)¦ 6¦(grammar)¦ ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ [Sense: 1 5; Origin: Old English mod mind, courage ] …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • mood — [ mud ] noun *** 1. ) count or uncount the way someone is feeling, for example whether they are happy, sad, or angry: He listens to rock or country music, depending on his mood. medicines that affect your mood and mental function in a… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Mood 92.0 FM — Mood 92 (Formally Mood FM) City of license Amman …   Wikipedia

  • mood — mood1 [mo͞od] n. [ME < OE mod, mind, soul, courage, akin to Ger mut, mental disposition, spirit, courage < IE base * me , to strive strongly, be energetic > L mos, custom, customary behavior] 1. a particular state of mind or feeling;… …   English World dictionary

  • Mood — Mood, n. [OE. mood, mod, AS. m[=o]dmind, feeling, heart, courage; akin to OS. & OFries. m[=o]d, D. moed, OHG. muot, G. muth, mut, courage, Dan. & Sw. mod, Icel. m[=o][eth]r wrath, Goth. m[=o]ds.] Temper of mind; temporary state of the mind in… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mood — (m[=oo]d), n. [The same word as mode, perh. influenced by mood temper. See {Mode}.] 1. Manner; style; mode; logical form; musical style; manner of action or being. See {Mode} which is the preferable form). [1913 Webster] 2. (Gram.) Manner of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mood — may refer to: Mood (psychology), a relatively long lasting emotional state Grammatical mood, one of a set of morphologically distinctive forms that are used to signal modality Mood (city), a city in Iran Mood District, a district in Iran Mood… …   Wikipedia

  • mood|y — «MOO dee», adjective, mood|i|er, mood|i|est. 1. likely to have changes of mood: »It is difficult to predict his reaction because he is so moody. 2. often having gloomy moods: » …   Useful english dictionary

  • mood — mood·i·ly; mood·i·ness; mood; …   English syllables